Overview of Connecting to Azure Analysis Services

With Azure Analysis Services Firewall off.

As admin account – Log in to Azure

Deploy model

Connect with SQL Server Management Studio from laptop

With admin account – 3 options for connecting

Does not work

Does not work

Using MFA does work – screen pops up for password and then another for text message before gaining access. – we can see the model as well, since this account is an Analysis Services Admin

As my non-admin account same three options for connecting

Does not work

Works but am just typing password in

Works but connects just asking for password, not asking for mfa, however does not have access to any databases as they are not marked as an admin. They will need a role assigned


Connect from Power BI

Using non-admin account

Using admin account – asks for password and MFA text

As admin create a read role in the model

Add non admin to read role

Try again to connect from Power BI using non admin account

Connection works with no MFA

 

 

 

Creating a RunAsAccount in Azure for Azure Automation

Warning: We have three different people with three different levels of security in our Azure tenant and only one of us could create this account.

Person 1: Is the owner of a Resource group and can create items in the resource group, including the Automation Account and Runbooks, but can not create the RunAsAccount

Person 2: Is the tenant admin and can do what Person 1 can do and a lot more, but does not have permissions to create a user in Azure AD, so can not create the RunAsAccount either.

Person 3: Has all of the permissions as person 2, but is also able to create users in Azure AD, so he was the only one that was able to create the RunAsAccount.

Below are the steps that he followed to create the account

1. In the Azure portal, click All resources. In the list of resources, select the Automation account from the list of Automation accounts.

2. In the left-hand pane, select Run As Accounts under the section Account Settings.

3. Select Azure Run As Account. After selecting the Add Azure Run As Account, a pane appears and after reviewing the overview information, click Create to proceed with Run As account creation.

4. While Azure creates the Run As account, you can track the progress under Notifications from the menu. A banner is also displayed stating the account is being created. This process can take a few minutes to complete.

Since we only wanted the RunAsAccount to have permissions to certain Resource groups and not the whole subscription, we followed the steps below.

Limiting Run As account permissions – To restrict what the RunAs service principal can do, you can remove the account from the contributor role to the subscription and add it as a contributor to the resource groups you want to specify.

1. In the Azure portal, select Subscriptions and choose the subscription of your Automation Account. Select Access control (IAM) and search for the service principal for your Automation Account (it looks like _unique identifier). Select the account and click Remove to remove it from the subscription.

2. To add the service principal to a resource group, select the resource group in the Azure portal and select Access control (IAM). Select Add, this opens the Add permissions page. For Role, select Contributor. In the Select text box type in the name of the service principal for your Run As account, and select it from the list. Click Save to save the changes. Do this for the resources groups you want to give your Azure Automation Run As service principal access to.

 

 

 

SQL Server Reporting Services Timeout

The other day we ran in to an issue where the report was running 30 minutes, this may be the only report that we have that runs this long, but then it fails. The only error message was “Report processing has been canceled by the user. (rsProcessingAborted), but after checking, no one canceled the report processing. What just happened?

It was determined that the Report timeout option was set to “Use the default setting” like most of our reports are.

 

Well, where is this default setting and what is it set to? The default settings timeout is set in the site settings page of your SQL Services Reporting Services and it was set to 1800 seconds or as you guessed, 30 minutes.

 

You have two options to fix the the timeout issue.

1. Change the default settings timeout for the whole site in the site settings page.

2. Change the Report timeout setting just for that report. This is done by going to the report, clicking the … and choosing manage.

You then scroll down to Advanced and either choose “Allow the report to run for (add amount of seconds here) seconds before timing out” and changing the seconds to a higher value that will allow the report to run or choose the “Allow the report to run indefinitely (no timeout)” option.

 

Click Apply and your report should not complete.

 

 

 

Combination of Both Worlds

I just recently came back to my blog and noticed that my last post stated that I was going back to Oracle. I did, but the fit with that employer was not the best and I moved on to another company at the beginning of 2016. I couldn’t be happier with that move in 2016. I get to work with SQL Server and Oracle along with other software packages. Some items that I am working on or researching and would like to blog about in the future, Automic Scheduling software, SQL Server on Linux, Azure, Azure Analysis Services, Business Intelligence, Power BI, Oracle Data Guard, Oracle Cloud and other various items.

Going back to Oracle

I am thrilled to say that after 4 years of working with Microsoft SQL Server and the BI Tool Stack, I am going back to working with Oracle. I enjoyed working with Microsoft and getting to add another tool in my tool belt, but I am very excited about this new opportunity.

Hopefully this opportunity will lend itself to more blog posts.

Stay tuned for more details.

Being lucky enough to go from DBA to Microsoft Business Intelligence

So far in my career I have been lucky enough to work with some really hot products. I started out of school as an Oracle DBA, while also performing SAP Basis duties. I did this for about 3 years, when I decided it was time to try something new. What I didn’t know at the time was that my Director did not want to lose me as a resource.

Our company was also starting to migrate our current Oracle and Cognos Data Warehouses to a Microsoft Data Warehouse. With my background as a DBA, they felt it was the next logical step in my career and they were right. I started in the group taking on SQL Server DBA tasks, while gaining the necessary skills with the Microsoft BI Stack. Looking back this was such an amazing opportunity. I was able to be an integral part of building the new warehouse from scratch. I had some brilliant co-workers, that were so willing to help me learn. I also had the opportunity to work with some really knowledgeable consultants from Pragmatic Works. A side effect to our company moving from the previous data warehouse to the new data warehouse was adopting Agile development. I had the opportunity to attend many BI related and Agile related trainings.

And now after leaving that company to join my current employer, I have continued to expand my BI skills. I am once again back to doing a lot of the SQL Server DBA tasks, but also learning more aspects of the process. I am still using Agile and the BI stack, but I’ve had the ability to bring my ideas to another warehouse conversion while also learning new approaches to migrations,  development and architecture.

My future goals are to become MCSE Certified and work towards an Architect position. At some point, I would also like to become a Microsoft MVP.